This academy, organized with AVAC, awards fellowships to advocates or peer educators to take part in workshops on HIV cure advocacy with international experts. The academy develops fellows’ cure research literacy and reinforces their advocacy and engagement skills in line with recommendations from Research priorities for an HIV cure: International AIDS Society Global Scientific Strategy 2021.

Applications are now open. Deadline Monday 25 March, 23.59 CET

Programe type
Fellowships
Opportunity Type
Short term (less than 6 months)
Select your country
Cure Academies Eligible Countries
Program User Type
Yusuf Hassan Wada

Yusuf Hassan Wada

What inspires you to work in the HIV field? I got inspired to work in the HIV field when I learnt that advocacy for cure is an indispensable part of the HIV cure agenda and young people can play a great role in advocating for improvement in health outcomes among people living with HIV and vulnerable populations. I see a future where young people take charge in solving challenges that have been bottlenecks in achieving a world free of AIDS. This is a future where young people are involved in all part of the response in communities, governments, policy, regulations, funding, research and advocacy to strengthen the chain. This will promote meaningful engagement to understand the problem and proposed solutions being pursued, accessing concerns and generating implementation insights. It is also a way to apply the skills and opportunities I had, following others who’ve just been great examples and models. What are your goals as an IAS change maker? My goal as an IAS change maker is to contribute my best and serve as a role model in moving towards an AIDS-free world, especially from a youth perspective. I’m also fortunate to be involved in many high-level activities, and I have a responsibility to set a good impression about the IAS fellowships and capacity building I have gone through. Today, I serve on the Community Advisory Board of the Pediatric Adolescent Virus Elimination (PAVE) and as a representative of the Global PAVE on the National Institutes of Health’s Martin Delaney Collaboratory for HIV cure research. I foresee a future where I act as a leader in the HIV advocacy and cure research, which will push low- and middle-income countries like Nigeria to streamline HIV cure as part of their strategy and plan and as part of their key health agenda.

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Talkmore Taurai Mazorodze

Talkmore Taurai Mazorodze

What inspires you to work in the HIV field? HIV has affected me in different ways, including losing close relatives and loved ones. The experience motivated and inspired me to be involved and work in the HIV field. It has always been my passion to improve the lives of people living with and affected by HIV and one day be counted among those individuals who have worked so hard to end the epidemic. The issue of HIV-related stigma and discrimination in our communities motivated me to educate people about HIV and show people that HIV was not about other people, but our families. What are your goals as an IAS change maker? My goals an IAS change maker are: To see an end to HIV-related stigma and discrimination through community outreach (education and social media) An increased understanding of HIV cure research information by people living with HIV in the communities across Eswatini To increase the understanding of U=U (undetectable = untransmittable) information among people living with HIV and healthcare workers

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Stacey Okeyo

Stacey Okeyo

What inspires you to work in the HIV field? I am a victim and this has been my number one driver. Apart from that, I believe that we all have equal chances and rights to enjoy all that life has to offer, regardless of one’s status or circumstances. Hence my urge and thirst in this field. What are your goals as an IAS change maker? My goals are to: Change the world and my community in HIV matters. Contribute thoughts, opinions, options, ideas and manpower to a better IAS. Carry the glory and pride of the IAS anywhere and everywhere its name is mentioned because of its positive impact in the field of HIV.

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Sinah Teemane

Sinah Teemane

What inspires you to work in the HIV field? As a person with a social science background, what motivates me the most in the HIV cure field is seeing people’s willingness to participate in HIV treatment. This is mostly achieved in community system strengthening approaches. I have used community conversations-community capacity enhancements, using the chieftaincy as an advocacy target in HIV prevention programmes. Botswana has recently engaged a model called Community Acting Together to Control HIV (CATCH). Biomedical researchers investigate and develop interventions, and establish their work in optimal conditions. Social science will make sure that these interventions are effective in the real world and are embraced by affected communities. What are your goals as an IAS change maker? My main goal as an HIV cure advocacy alumni is to build community competency in addressing HIV cure and research and advocacy strategies. I will be happy to see greater public awareness on HIV cure research and advocacy strategies in my country. Botswana has been at the epicentre of the HIV epidemic for decades and has led the continent in its response to the crisis. The Botswana-Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health AIDS Institute Partnership was established in partnership with the Botswana Ministry of Health in 1996. I would like to see chiefs taking the lead in raising awareness in their communities to realize the importance of HIV cure and research. The kgotla system (chieftaincy) is a platform for regular consultations on national issues between the government and various leaders of opposition parties, where everyone has the right to voice their opinions.

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Reuben Silungwe

Reuben Silungwe

What inspires you to work in the HIV field? I have witnessed people close to me die of AIDS-related causes and I have a close family member living with HIV. Being a member of a key population, I believe I do understand what it means to face multiple stigma and discrimination and its impact on the access and utilization of healthcare in hostile settings despite the steady engagement of key populations. Structural issues remain problematic and must be challenged. The quality of care and client-informed support makes a difference in the response in addressing the gaps in HIV treatment, care and support. I believe there is no meaningful response to HIV without an HIV cure agenda that takes into account the community and low-income countries and their role in the HIV and AIDS response. What are your goals as an IAS change maker? My goal is to see communities most affected by HIV and AIDS meaningfully engaged and consulted on issues about them in the national, regional and global responses to HIV and AIDS. We may not be clinical experts in the treatment of HIV in medical terms. But being disproportionately affected by HIV makes us co-experts in finding better interventions in changing the course of HIV and AIDS, as well as ending the epidemic. Research has contributed to the understanding HIV and AIDS, but there is still a need to engage researchers from previously underrepresented groups, such as key populations, and investing in infrastructure that includes us in the research agenda.

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Q Bee B Chihera Meki

Q Bee B Chihera Meki

What inspires you to work in the HIV field? Being a trans woman is a big challenge; you get beaten, harassed and raped and have nowhere to report it. A few months later, you go for testing with your new partner and discover that you are positive. I lost him. I lost half of my close family and friends. With AVAC and other activists and advocates, I began to have hope in biomedical prevention. I chose to dedicate my life to helping my fellow trans people and others in the LGBTIQ community. This is to bring hope and find ground for biomedical and other treatment to include us so that we have variety of prevention methods. What are your goals as an IAS change maker? These are my goals: Inclusion and involvement in research on the trans and intersex community Making sure that research is community led Engagement between scientists, advocates and activists, and the community Africa leading research for an HIV cure STIs also to have a vaccine and many methods of prevention Strengthening the hope of the community living with HIV Transparency and accountability

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Oguzhan Nuh

Oguzhan Nuh

What inspires you to work in the HIV field? I believe my story can raise awareness and create understanding of how discrimination fuelled by stigma affects the lives of people living with HIV. Also, I believe there is need for researchers who are also community members in order to influence the stigma and discriminatory language within academic networks. What are your goals as an IAS change maker? My goals are to reach out to as many people as possible and share my experiences and knowledge, which I have gained doing HIV advocacy for five years.

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Nivedita Dutta

Nivedita Dutta

What inspires you to work in the HIV field? My motivation is the constant challenge of stigma and discrimination. What are your goals as an IAS change maker? My goals are to: Contribute to reducing stigma and discrimination. Find better treatment and care of subjects. Provide access to the best of treatment. Be part of ongoing research on reducing opportunistic infections and reducing ARV drug toxicities. Conduct research to cure HIV.

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Natalia Laufer

Natalia Laufer

What inspires you to work in the HIV field? When I began my medical career, the HIV pandemic had been known for a long time. But many issues were still unresolved: from prevention and diagnosis to treatment. Many still are! I felt the need to help find some these answers and accompany people living with HIV in the search for better treatment and quality of life. In this field, I found the possibility to combine medical care activity with clinical and basic research. What are your goals as an IAS change maker? My goals are to help improve the quality of life of people with HIV and help create a network of clinical and basic research in Latin America that includes local experts with different biomedical and social backgrounds and with the support of researchers from other parts the world. I believe that working together could improve the level of our research and allow us to have faster answers to the many unresolved aspects of HIV.

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Maurine Murenga

Maurine Murenga

What inspires you to work in the HIV field? In the late 1990s and early 2000, HIV took us through a very deep spiral of depression and anxiety. Society judged and blamed us. The world stigmatized and rejected us. We needed to fight back. We needed to be treated better. We needed to be understood. And you are right, we needed to be loved. That was motivation enough to join other people living with HIV to advocate for access to treatment and a life of dignity. Dignity and a quality life were not things that were going to be handed on a silver platter for us to enjoy; we had to fight for them. Advocacy moved from being a necessity to being what I love doing on a daily basis. Though we are not yet at a perfect place, we have made some gains and, yes, we will continue the fight to keep the gains. What are your goals as an IAS change maker? As an IAS change maker, I understand my role as that of achieving positive change for the greater good of people living with HIV and affected by TB by taking innovative actions. It is my role to continue influencing, inspiring and mentoring others to join, support and contribute to the change effort until it is achieved.

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The IAS promotes the use of non-stigmatizing, people-first language. The translations are all automated in the interest of making our content as widely accessible as possible. Regretfully, they may not always adhere to the people-first language of the original version.