This annual academy, organized with the South African Department of Science and Innovation and the Faculty of Health Sciences at the University of the Witwatersrand, awards fellowships to early- to mid-career investigators and clinical scientists to take part in workshops on HIV cure research with international experts. The academy provides training and resources on HIV cure and reinforces tools and methodologies in line with recommendations from Research priorities for an HIV cure: International AIDS Society Global Scientific Strategy 2021.

Applications are now closed.

Programe type
Fellowships
Opportunity Type
Short term (less than 6 months)
Select your country
Cure Academies Eligible Countries
Program User Type
Shivaji K Jadhav

Shivaji K Jadhav

What inspires you to work in the HIV field? My main motivation to participate in the HIV cure meeting is to exchange novel innovative ideas to work on HIV cure strategies. It also provides immense knowledge sharing by HIV experts, including clinicians, to work towards HIV elimination. Participation in finding cure strategies will help me carry out my proposed research in a better way. It also provides me with an opportunity to interact with top-class scientists around the globe and discuss issues related to HIV pathogenesis and prevention of HIV transmission and recent advances in HIV vaccine and efficacy studies and developments using different animal models. What are your goals as an IAS change maker? Knowledge gained in the meeting will be discussed in a presentation to scientists and clinicians. Our comments will be posted on websites or blogs on meeting updates, and knowledge will be shared with the scientific community.

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Sheila Fernández-Luis

Sheila Fernández-Luis

What inspires you to work in the HIV field? My main motivation as a paediatrician and HIV researcher has always been to address the inequality in paediatric HIV incidence, prevalence and care. Children are particularly vulnerable to HIV because of the rapid progression of the disease without treatment. However, progress in the HIV response has been slower in the paediatric population than among adults, with children having less access to life-saving treatment. Having witnessed first-hand how administration of treatment remains an enormous challenge for young children and how this affects their health-related quality of life, I am more motivated than ever to deepen my focus on paediatric HIV in low- and middle-income countries. What are your goals as an IAS change maker? In the short and medium term, my goals are to fight inequality and contribute to generating scientific evidence on strategies to improve long-term clinical outcomes and quality of life in children living with HIV in low- and middle-income countries, in particular in southern Mozambique, where I’m based. My long-term goals are working toward ending vertical transmission and looking for remission in children who are already living with HIV.

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Reena Rajasuriar

Reena Rajasuriar

What inspires you to work in the HIV field? I am motivated by the disparity in health outcomes that still exists in people living with HIV despite effective treatment. What are your goals as an IAS change maker? My goal is to use science to empower and promote optimal health and well-being in people living with HIV.

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Q Bee B Chihera Meki

Q Bee B Chihera Meki

What inspires you to work in the HIV field? Being a trans woman is a big challenge; you get beaten, harassed and raped and have nowhere to report it. A few months later, you go for testing with your new partner and discover that you are positive. I lost him. I lost half of my close family and friends. With AVAC and other activists and advocates, I began to have hope in biomedical prevention. I chose to dedicate my life to helping my fellow trans people and others in the LGBTIQ community. This is to bring hope and find ground for biomedical and other treatment to include us so that we have variety of prevention methods. What are your goals as an IAS change maker? These are my goals: Inclusion and involvement in research on the trans and intersex community Making sure that research is community led Engagement between scientists, advocates and activists, and the community Africa leading research for an HIV cure STIs also to have a vaccine and many methods of prevention Strengthening the hope of the community living with HIV Transparency and accountability

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Onoya Onaluwa

Onoya Onaluwa

What inspires you to work in the HIV field? More than 40 years after the discovery of HIV, the pandemic remains a global health crisis with more than 78 million people acquiring HIV since 1981; 37 million people are currently living with HIV and 39 million have died from HIV-related conditions. Although central, eastern, western and southern Africa is the most affected, the eastern and southern Africa regions bear about 60% of the global burden of HIV. This could not leave me cold; it required immediate action. What are your goals as an IAS change maker? HIV is preventable, treatable and, soon, curable. I strongly believe that: 1. We can significantly reduce the number of HIV acquisitions globally if we scale up the available proven prevention measures. 2. We can significantly reduce the morbidity and mortality rate of HIV by adequately using the available antiretroviral drugs arsenal.

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One Dintwe

One Dintwe

What inspires you to work in the HIV field? My inspiration is the development of a vaccine to prevent HIV acquisition. I have seen my family affected by and living with HIV, and seen the impact it has on our lives. What are your goals as an IAS change maker? My goal is to develop innovative approaches to understanding HIV vaccine-induced T cell responses in order to assist in developing effective preventative HIV vaccines, with the ultimate goal to curb the HIV pandemic.

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Natalia Laufer

Natalia Laufer

What inspires you to work in the HIV field? When I began my medical career, the HIV pandemic had been known for a long time. But many issues were still unresolved: from prevention and diagnosis to treatment. Many still are! I felt the need to help find some these answers and accompany people living with HIV in the search for better treatment and quality of life. In this field, I found the possibility to combine medical care activity with clinical and basic research. What are your goals as an IAS change maker? My goals are to help improve the quality of life of people with HIV and help create a network of clinical and basic research in Latin America that includes local experts with different biomedical and social backgrounds and with the support of researchers from other parts the world. I believe that working together could improve the level of our research and allow us to have faster answers to the many unresolved aspects of HIV.

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Mkunde Chachage

Mkunde Chachage

What inspires you to work in the HIV field? Like any African, living in Tanzania means that you are either living with or affected by HIV in one way or another. This drove me to crafting and dedicating my career to studying HIV and other life-threatening pathogens. My research focus is on studying HIV pathogenesis, preventive and therapeutic studies. I have been or am involved in studies that investigate: 1. Pathogenic mechanism during HIV co-infection with other pathogens, including helminthes and human papilloma viruses. 2. Mechanisms for the increased risk of HIV acquisition in individuals infected with filarial worms. 3. Differences in the induction of vaccine-induced immune responses between different populations. 4. Premature immune ageing in children living with HIV. 5. Host and viral factors for COVID-19 outcomes in Tanzania What are your goals as an IAS change maker? While HIV treatment has reduced mortality and morbidity, the risk for age-related conditions, such as cardiovascular disease and metabolic disorders among people ageing with HIV, even under therapy, is still high. My goal is to monitor children growing with HIV for early identification and intervention of high-risk factors for age-related conditions. Realizing that the HIV response isn’t complete without an HIV cure, my ambition is also to participate and advocate for HIV cure research in Tanzania, especially those involving development of HIV vaccine candidates and innovative clinical trial concepts.

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Mitch Matoga

Mitch Matoga

What inspires you to work in the HIV field? My drive is to one day be part of a team that will contribute to finding a cure for HIV. What are your goals as an IAS change maker? My goal is to continue to bring changes to the HIV research space that will result in tangible impacts on the HIV epidemic in my country.

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Minyahil Woldu

Minyahil Woldu

What inspires you to work in the HIV field? My decision to participate in the field of HIV cure research is influenced by several considerations. The fundamental reason is that as a clinical pharmacist, I am required to be involved in these matters. HIV cure research has always been a high priority for me after realizing that countless Africans die as a result of HIV. What are your goals as an IAS change maker? My objectives as a clinical pharmacist and HIV cure academy researcher are to actively participate in cure research, conduct baseline assessments of HIV reservoirs, test experimental and potential drugs, and disseminate information and communicate with the scientific community through appropriate channels.

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The IAS promotes the use of non-stigmatizing, people-first language. The translations are all automated in the interest of making our content as widely accessible as possible. Regretfully, they may not always adhere to the people-first language of the original version.