2014 Towards an HIV Cure Symposium
19 & 20 July 2014 | Melbourne, Australia

Background

Under the auspices of the International AIDS Society, an international working group of researchers developed a Global Scientific Strategy: Towards an HIV Cure, which was launched in July 2012 in Washington, DC. Following a first successful workshop in Vienna at AIDS 2010, the IAS and the Towards an HIV Cure Advisory Board convened two symposia in line with the scientific priorities outlined in the Global Scientific Strategy. The symposia, organized in conjunction with the AIDS 2012 and IAS 2013 conferences, provided a platform to present state-of-the-art basic science and clinical research on the HIV cure research priority areas defined in the strategy.

Following the success of the symposia, the IAS and the Towards an HIV Cure Advisory Board convened another 2-day symposium immediately prior to the 20th International AIDS Conference in Melbourne in July 2014.

The symposium was co-chaired by Françoise Barré-Sinoussi, IAS President, Steven Deeks, Professor of Medicine at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), and Sharon Lewin, Director of the Infectious Diseases Unit, Alfred Hospital, Monash University. The symposium gave further impetus to HIV cure research, whilst also offering an important opportunity for the delegates to share ideas, debate, and network among their peers.

Objectives

  • Provide an opportunity for scientists who are working on HIV cure to share ideas, debate, and network among their peers
  • Develop knowledge on the priorities that future research must address in order to tackle HIV persistence in patients on ART
  • Accelerate research on viral reservoirs and latency as the way towards achieving a cure for HIV infection
  • Promote increased investments in HIV/AIDS cure research
  • Provide a platform for information-sharing between scientists, clinicians, funders, media and members of civil society.

Themes of the Symposium

The symposium was structured around an opening keynote speaker, four oral abstract sessions, three roundtable discussions, a poster exhibition, and a closing keynote presentation.  There was also an award ceremony for the IAS-ANRS Prize on HIV Cure.

Day 1

Oral Abstract Session 1: Clearing HIV-Infected Cells: Kill
Oral Abstract Session 2: Reversing Latent HIV: Shock
Roundtable Discussion: Analytical Treatment Interruption in HIV Cure Research
Oral Abstract Session 3: Why Does HIV Persist on ART?

Day 2

Roundtable Discussion: Preparedness for HIV Cure in Resource-Limited Settings
Oral Abstract Session 4: Where Does HIV Persist on ART?
Roundtable Discussion: Public and Private Partnerships in HIV Cure Research


IAS-ANRS Prize on HIV Cure


The US$2,000 IAS/ANRS Young Investigator Award is jointly funded by the IAS and the Agence Nationale de Recherche sur le sida et les hépatites virales (ANRS) to support young researchers who demonstrate innovation, originality, rationale and quality in the field of HIV/AIDS research. The 2014 Prize was awarded to Gilles Darcis, Service of Molecular Virology, Institut de Biologie et de Médicine Moléculaires (IBMM) and Université Libre de Bruxelles (ULB), Belgium.



The Symposium Programme Committee


Scientific Coordination

  • Anna-Laura Ross

Event Organization

  • Rosanne Lamplough

With the support of:


 

Symposium material

  • Related documents
  • Day 1
  • Day 2
  • Poster Exhibition
  • Multimedia

Day 1

Opening Session

Keynote Address: The Role of Therapeutic Vaccination in HIV Cure Strategies
Jeff Lifson, Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research, USA

Presentation | Audio

Oral Abstract Session 1: Clearing HIV-Infected Cells: Kill

Invited Speaker: Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation, Graft-versus-Host Disease and the Elimination of HIV
Geoff Hill, Queensland Institute of Medical Research, Australia

OA1-1: A population of CD8 T cells is located in germinal centers that is functionally capable of mediating bispecific antibody mediated killing of HIV-infected T cells
Richard Koup, Vaccine Research Center, United States

Abstract | Presentation | Audio

OA1-2: Potent and Broadly Anti-HIV-1 Neutralizing Antibody VRC01 Inhibits HIV-1 Transmission from Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells to CD4 T Lymphocytes
Bin Su, Inserm, France

Abstract |Presentation

OA1-3: HIV Controller CD4+ T cells preferentially express a public TCR clonotype that confers high avidity responses against Gag
Lisa A. Chakrabarti, Institut Pasteur, France

Abstract | Presentation |Audio

OA1-4: Co-localization of Follicular SIV-specific CD8 T Cells with Tfh in the Germinal Centers of Chronically SIV Infected Rhesus Macaques is Associated with Enhanced Viral Control
Rama Rao Amara, Emory University, United States

Abstract | Presentation | Audio

Oral Abstract Session 2: Reversing Latent HIV: Shock

Invited Speaker: Epigenetic Regulation of HIV Latency
Melanie Ott, Gladstone Institutes and University of California, San Francisco, United States

OA2-1: Synergistic activation of HIV-1 expression by compounds releasing active positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb) and by inducers of the NF-kB signaling pathway
Gilles Darcis, Université Libre de Bruxelles and Université de Liège, Belgium

Abstract

OA2-2: A new family of compounds that reactivate latent HIV in central memory T cells
Vicente Planelles, University of Utah, United States<

Abstract | Presentation | Audio

OA2-3: Induction and Clearance of Latent HIV Infection: Modeling Viral Clearance by Immune Effectors using Cells from ART-treated Patients
David Margolis, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, United States

Abstract | Presentation |Audio

OA2-4 LB: The HDAC Inhibitor Romidepsin is Safe and Effectively Reverses HIV-1 latency in vivo as Measured by Standard Clinical Assays
Ole S. Søgaard, Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark

Abstract |Presentation | Audio

Roundtable: Analytical Treatment Interruption in HIV Cure

Audio

Chair: Edwina Wright, The Alfred Hospital, Monash University & Burnet Institute, Australia

Panelists (in order of presentation):

Deborah Persaud, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine

Lars Østergaard, Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark

Presentation

Daniel Kuritzkes, Brigham and Women’s Hopsital, Harvard Medical School, United States

Jeremy Sugarman, Johns Hopkins Berman Institute of Bioethics, United States

Presentation

Giulio Maria Corbelli,, European AIDS Treatment Group, Italy

Judith Auerbach, University of North Carolina at San Francisco, United States

 


Oral Abstract Session 3: Why Does HIV Persist on ART?

Invited Speaker: Therapeutic Efficacy of Neutralizing Antibodies for HIV
Dan Barouch, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Ragon Institute of MGH, MIT, and Harvard, United States

OA3-1: Genetically characterizing the role of cell proliferation in maintaining persistent HIV during effective HIV therapy
Sarah Palmer, Westmead Millennium Institute and University of Sydney, Australia

Abstract | Presentation | Audio

OA3-2:TLR2 stimulation promotes HIV-1 infection of CD4+ T cells by increasing the susceptibility of CCR6- T cells to infection
Jean-François Bolduc, Université Laval, Canada

Abstract | Presentation | Audio

OA3-3: Interleukin-21 improves reconstitution of intestinal Th17 and Th22 cells and reduces residual inflammation in ART-suppressed SIV-infected Rhesus Macaques
Mirko Paiardini, Emory University, United States

Abstract | Presentation | Audio

OA3-4 LB: Cryptic transcription of HIV-RNA species from "defective" proviruses: A novel pathway for persistent immune activation in patients with HIV-1 infection and mechanism for persistent seropositivity despite “undetectable” levels of virus
Hiromi Imamichi, NIAID/NIH, United States

Abstract |Presentation | Audio

OA3-5 LB: IL-7 increases HIV-1 proviral integration in CD4+ T cells by inducing SAMHD1 phosphorylation, which can be blocked by Lck and PKCθ inhibitors
Maria Teresa Coiras, Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Spain

Abstract

Roundtable: Preparedness for HIV Cure in Resource-Limited Settings

Audio

Chair: Paula Munderi, MRC/UVRI Uganda Research Unit on AIDS, Uganda

Panelists (in order of presentation):

Jintanat Ananworanich, US Military HIV Research Program, United States

Presentation

Robert Murphy, Northwestern University, United States

Presentation

Mathurin Tejiokem, Pasteur Centre of Cameroon, Cameroon

Presentation

Joseph Tucker, University of North Carolina Project-China, China

Presentation

Oral Abstract Session 4: Where Does HIV Persist on ART?

Invited Speaker: Impact of Antiretroviral Treatment on HIV Reservoirs
Christine Rouzioux, Université Paris-Descartes, France

Presentation | Audio

OA4-1: The Immune Checkpoint Blockers PD-1, LAG-3 and TIGIT are Biomarkers of HIV Infected Cells During ART and Identify Distinct Cellular Reservoirs
Remi Fromentin, VGTI Florida, United States

Abstract | Presentation | Audio

OA4-2: Following in vitro culture with myeloid dendritic cells, negative regulators of T-cell activation are expressed preferentially on latently infected CD4+ T-cells
Vanessa A. Evans, Monash University and Burnet Institute, Australia

Abstract | Presentation |Audio

OA4-3: Ultra-deep barcoded SIVmac239 to identify and quantify viral reservoirs and recrudescent viremia
Brandon Keele, Frederick National Laboratory, United States

Abstract | Presentation | Audio

OA4-4: In vivo analysis of HIV replication and persistence in the myeloid compartment
J. Victor Garcia Martinez, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, United States

Abstract | Presentation | Audio

OA4-5: Simian Immunodeficiency Virus (SIV) infection of the macaque testis - An Immune privileged site
Wendy Winnall, University of Melbourne, Australia

Abstract | Presentation | Audio

OA4-6 LB: A novel assay that precisely measures the size of the latent HIV reservoir reveals that ART-naïve individuals harbour a large pool of latently infected CD4+ T cells
Nicolas Chomont, VGTI Florida, United States

Abstract | Presentation | Audio

Roundtable: Public and Private Partnerships in HIV Cure Research

Audio

Chairs:
Sharon Lewin, The Alfred Hospital, Monash University and Burnet Institute, Australia

Zhi Hong, GlaxoSmithKline, United States

Panelists:
Mike McCune, University of North Carolina, San Francisco, United States

Presentation

David Kaslow, PATH, United States

Presentation

Closing Session


Closing Keynote: Targeting chromatin remodelling as a treatment for haematogical malignancies – lessons we can learn for the treatment of latent HIV
Miles Prince, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Australia

Presentation | Audio

IAS-ANRS Young Investigator Prize Ceremony

Presentation

Innate Immune Responses and Function during HIV Infection

PE1: HIV controllers have activated NK cells with a particular NK cell receptor profile and higher degranulation capacity
Daniel Scott-Algara, Institut Pasteur, France

Abstract

PE2: Modulation of HIV-induced TLR activation by ammonium compounds: new therapeutic strategy to reduce chronic immune activation?
Nikaïa Smith, Université Paris Descartes, France

Abstract

Virus-Specific Humoral Immunity

PE3: Evolution of neutralizing antibodies in acute heterosexually acquired HIV-1C infections
Takafira Mduluza, University of Zimbabwe, Zimbabwe

Abstract

Virus-Specific Cellular Immunity

PE4: Antiretroviral therapy preserves polyfunctional HIV-1-specific CD8 T cells with stem cell-like properties
Selena Vigano, The Ragon Institute of MGH, MIT and Harvard, United States

Abstract

Immune Responses in Resistant Cohorts: Long-Term Non-Progressors and Highly Exposed, Seronegative Individuals

PE5: Immunity to HIV GAG peptides and routine vaccine antigens in HIV-exposed uninfected infants in the ART era
Louise A. K. Afran, Malawi Liverpool Wellcome Trust, Malawi

Abstract

Correlates of Immune Protection

PE6: A longitudinal assessment of host immunosuppressive responses in primary and chronic HIV infection
Jean-Pierre Routy, McGill University Health Centre, Candada

Abstract

Mechanisms of Activation/Inflammation and Impact on Pathogenesis

PE7: Social Stress Prior to SIV or SHIV Infection Associates with Higher Viral Load and Lower CD4 Counts
Gretchen Neigh, Emory University, United States

Abstract

PE8: Increased Immune Activation and Hypercoagulation after Gut Permeabilization in SIV-Infected African Green Monkeys
Ivona Pandrea, University of Pittsburgh, United States

Abstract

PE9: Comparison between Pathogenic and Nonpathogenic SIV Infections and Focus on Mucosal Tissue Compartment Reveal a Critical Role for the Adenosine Pathway in the Control of SIV-Related Immune Activation and Inflammation
Tianyu He, University of Pittsburgh, United States

Abstract

PE10: SIV-infected rhesus macaques receiving suppressive cART have continued GI damage, inflammation, immune activation and persistent low-level viral replication within lymphoid tissues
Jacob Estes, Leidos Biomedical Research, Inc., Frederick National Laboratory, United States

Abstract

HIV Replication and Pathogenesis in other Organs and Tissues

PE11: Envelope glycoprotein determinants of macrophage tropism during progressive HIV-1 subtype C infection
Katharina Borm, Burnet Institute, Australia

Abstract

PE12: Preliminary Assessment of the Neurocognitive Effects of Vorinostat Administration in HIV Eradication
Kevin Robertson, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, United States

Abstract | Poster

Viral Replication (including necessary cellular elements)

PE13: Naïve CD4+ T-cells are resistant to HIV infection in vitro in the presence of homeostatic signals
Khoury, Affiliation, Australia

Abstract

Viral Mechanisms of Persistence and Latency

PE14: Tropism alterations of HIV-1 subtype C strains for CD4+ T cell subsets
Jacqueline Flynn, Burnet Institute, Australia

Abstract

PE15: HIV-1 establishes transcriptional latency in astrocytes in vitro and is responsive to HDACi
Lachlan Gray, Burnet Institute, Australia

Abstract

PE16: Alternative RNA splicing in latently infected T cells generates chimeric cellular: HIV mRNAs with the potential to generate Tat and reactivate infection
Secondo Sonza, University of Melbourne, Australia

Abstract | Poster

PE17: Alternative RNA splicing in latently infected T cells generates chimeric cellular: HIV mRNAs with the potential to generate Tat and reactivate infection
William Hey-Cunningham, Kirby Institute, Australia

Abstract | Poster

PE18 LB: Gag-mediated autophagy promotes CD4 T cell survival: a possible mechanism for HIV reservoir persistence
Haishan Li, University of Maryland School of Medicine, United States

Abstract

Host Cellular Factors and Latency

PE19: Drug Leads that Inhibit Vif and Enable APOBEC3G are Broadly Neutralizing of HIV1 Clades and Drug-resistant Strains
Harold Smith, University of Rochester, United States

Abstract

PE20: Co-culture of antigen presenting cells can induce latency in resting CD4+ T-cells
Nitasha Kumar, Monash University, Australia

Abstract | Poster

PE21: Possible clearance of transfusion-acquired nef-deleted attenuated HIV-1 infection by a long-term non-progressor with CCR5 Delta32 heterozygous and HLA-B57/DR13 genotype
John Zaunders, St. Vincent’s Hospital, Australia

Abstract

PE22: Targeting HIV Splicing and Translation in Latently Infected T cells: Contributing to a Cure
Khoury, Affiliation, Australia

Abstract

Tissue Reservoirs

PE23: In vivo analysis of HIV persistence and immune responses in the brain
Rae Ann Spagnuolo, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, United States

Abstract

PE24: During the course of HIV infection tissue-resident effector memory CD4+ T cells are depleted but tissue-resident central memory CD4+ T cells are preserved
Angela Wahl, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, United States

Abstract

PE25 LB: Preferential infection of central memory T-cells that express CCR6 and CXCR3 in HIV-infected patients on ART may contribute to a larger HIV reservoir in rectal tissue
Jenny Anderson, The Alfred Hospital and Monash University, Australia

Abstract

Measurement of Reservoirs

PE26: Continued decay of HIV DNA species during 3 years of ART is not reflected by decay of HIV RNA in plasma
William Hey-Cunningham, Kirby Institute, Australia

Abstract | Poster

PE27 LB: Distinct transcriptional regulators associated to the control of HIV reservoirs in central-memory CD4 T cells from Elite Controllers and long-term ARV treated patients or after IL-7
Brigitte Autran, University Pierre et Marie Curie, France

Abstract | Poster

Targeting and Eradication of Reservoirs

PE28: Transcriptomic and proteomic screening of host genes modulated by HIV-1 in human macrophages: a highly sensitive strategy for the identification of new targets specific of HIV reservoirs
Alexandre Deshiere, Laval University, Canada

Abstract

PE29: Immunotherapy depletion of T-cells in NHPs infected with SIV: Impact on viral load and T cell activation
Michele Di Mascio, NIAID/NIH, United States

Abstract

PE30: RNA targeting the promoter region potently inhibits HIV-1 activation from latently infected cells
Kazuo Suzuki, The Kirby Institute, Australia

Abstract

PE31: Apoptosis Activation of HIV Replication
Steven Zeichner, Children's National Medical Center/George Washington University, United States

Abstract

PE32: Viral specificity of small molecule latency disruptors
JJ Miranda, Gladstone Institutes and University of California, San Francisco, United States

Abstract

PE33: A dual-reporter cell line, expressing basal levels of Tat from its native IRES, reveals the poor specificity of current epigenetic modifying drugs for proviral HIV-1 activation
Jonathan Jacobson, University of Melbourne, Australia

Abstract

PE34: Modeling the effects of vorinostat in vivo on activation of latent HIV infection
Sharon Lewin, The Alfred Hospital, Monash University and Burnet Institute, Australia

Abstract

PE35: Development of T-Pharmacytes for the Targeted Eradication of HIV Reservoirs
Brad Jones, Ragon Institute of MGH, MIT and Harvard, United States

Abstract

PE36: Quantification of Drug Transporters in Vaginal and Cervical Tissue Using a Novel Targeted Proteomics Approach: Implications for Small Molecule Disposition in Viral Reservoirs
Corbin Thompson, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, United States

Abstract

PE37 LB: The 'kick-and-kill' approach to a cure: Going for the kill by selective induction of apoptosis in latently infected cells
Michael Mathews, Rutgers-New Jersey Medical School, United States

Abstract

PE38 LB: Multidose vorinostat in HIV-infected individuals on effective ART leads to an increase in regulatory T-cells but no change in inducible virus or HIV-specific T-cells
Fiona Wightman, Monash University, Australia

Abstract

Host Genetics of Resistance and Susceptibility

PE39: Evolutionary analysis identifies an MX2 haplotype associated with natural resistance to HIV-1 infection
Federica Gnudi, University of Milan, Italy

Abstract | Poster

Host Restriction Factors (including APOBEC and TRIM)

PE40: Quantification of Host Restriction Factor Gene Expression in HLA-B*57+ Individuals
Rui Andre Saraiva Raposo, The George Washington University, United States

Abstract

Therapeutic Vaccines

PE41: Therapeutic vaccine-induced Gag-specific CD8+ T cells under anti-retroviral therapy contribute to viral control in a macaque AIDS model
Midori Nakamura, University of Tokyo / AIDS Research Center, National Institute of Infectious Diseases, Japan

Abstract

PE42: Heteroclitic Human Immunodeficiency Virus Peptides Augment Cytokine Production, Increase Proliferation and Reduce PD-1 Expression by HIV-specific CD8+ T cells

Adeolu Adegoke, Memorial University, Canada

Abstract | Poster

PE43: Allogeneic assassination: NK cells demonstrate robust anti-HIV antibody-dependent activation against allogeneic targets
Shayarana Gooneratne, University of Melbourne, Australia

Abstract

PE44 LB: Impact of RNA loaded Dendritic cell immunotherapy on HIV sequence Evolution in Chronic HIV Subjects Undergoing ATI
Irina Tcherepanova, Argos Therapeutics, Inc., United States

Abstract

Animal Models of Latency Reservoirs and Eradication

PE45: Use of A New, Transmitted Founder SIV Strain (SIVsmmFTq) to Achieve Control of Virus Replication with Conventional Antiretroviral Therapy (ART) in Rhesus Macaques (RMs)
Cristian Apetrei, University of Pittsburgh, United States

Abstract

Immune-Based Therapy Trials

PE46: A pilot study of the impact of rosuvastatin administration on residual chronic immune activation under antiretroviral therapy: the CESAR-IMEA trial
Laurence Weiss, Affiliation, Country

Abstract

Eradication / Reservoir Depletion: Impact of ART and Non-ART Treatment

PE47 LB: Impact of early initiation of combination antiretroviral therapy on measures of virus in peripheral blood of vertically HIV-1 infected children
Jason Brophy, Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario, University of Ottawa, Canada

Abstract | Poster

PE48 LB: Allogeneic bone marrow transplantation in two HIV-1 infected patients shows no detectable HIV-1 RNA or DNA, and a profound reduction in HIV-1 antibodies
Kersten Koelsch, The Kirby Institute, UNSW, Australia

Abstract | Poster

PE49 LB: Immunological Correlates of HIV-1 DNA Decline During Latency Reversal with Panobinostat in Patients on Suppressive cART
Martin Tolstrup, Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark

Abstract

Novel Therapeutic Approaches (including gene therapy)

PE50: Agonistic antibody to human IL-21 promotes cytotoxic immune response to control viral infection
Di Yu, Monash University, Australia

Abstract

Mixed Methods, Integrated Approaches and Synergies in HIV Research and Intervention

PE51: Stakeholder engagement in HIV cure research - Lessons learned from other interventions and the way forward
Joseph Tucker, University of North Carolina Project-China, China

Abstract

Community Engagement in Research and Research Dissemination

PE52: Global Investment in HIV Cure Research and Development in 2013: Promising science and international collaborations
Emily Donaldson, AVAC, United States

Abstract

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