2012 Towards an HIV Cure Symposium
20 & 21 July 2012 | Washington D.C, USA

Background

Under the auspices of the International AIDS Society, an international working group of researchers developed a Global Scientific Strategy aimed at building a global consensus on the state of the HIV reservoirs field and defining scientific priorities that must be addressed by future research to tackle HIV persistence in patients on antiretroviral therapy.

The Global Scientific Strategy: Towards an HIV Cure was released at a 2-day symposium, co-chaired by Françoise Barré-Sinoussi, 2008 Nobel Laureate for Medicine and IAS President-elect and Steven Deeks, Professor of Medicine at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) for up to 250 basic and clinical science researchers and research advocates. The symposium took place in Washington, D.C. on 20 & 21 July 2012, immediately preceding the XIX International AIDS Conference.

Objectives

  • Develop knowledge on the priorities that future research must address in order to tackle HIV persistence in patients on ART.
  • Accelerate research on viral reservoirs as the way towards achieving a cure for HIV infection
  • Provide an opportunity for scientists who are working on HIV cure to share ideas, debate, and network among their peers
  • Promote better investments in HIV/AIDS cure research

Themes of the symposium; presentations & abstracts

The symposium was structured around an opening keynote speaker, 7 thematic sessions including invited presentations and abstract presentations, a closing keynote presentation and a poster exhibition.

The themes of the symposium were:

Day 1

  • Cellular and viral mechanisms that maintain HIV persistence
  • Tissue and cellular sources of persistent HIV in long-term ART-treated individuals
  • Origins of immune activation and inflammation in the presence of ART and their consequences for HIV persistence

Day 2

  • Host and immune mechanisms that control infection but allow viral persistence
  • Assays to measure persistent infection: comparison and validation
  • Therapeutic agents or immunological strategies to safely eliminate latent infection in individuals on ART
  • Strategies to enhance the capacity of the host response to control active viral replication

Details of the symposium

The symposium was closely linked to the AIDS 2012 conference programme. Track A and B (basic and clinical sciences) abstracts submitted to the International AIDS Conference and related to the topic of HIV cure were considered for the symposium (oral presentations and posters), while results from the symposium were shared with the participants attending AIDS 2012.

Please click here for more detailed information on the background and objectives of this initiative and for any additional information please contact [email protected].

Continuing Medical Education (CME) Accreditation

The University of California, San Francisco School of Medicine (USCF) is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians. UCSF designates this live activity for a maximum of 13 AMA PRA Category 1CreditsTM.

This activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the essential areas and policies of the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) through the joint sponsorship of the University of California, San Francisco School of Medicine (UCSF) and International AIDS Society.

IAS-ANRS Prize on HIV Cure

The US$2,000 IAS/ANRS Young Investigator Award is jointly funded by the IAS and the Agence Nationale de Recherche sur le sida et les hépatites virales (ANRS) to support young researchers who demonstrate innovation, originality, rationale and quality in the field of HIV/AIDS research.

Nitasha Kumar, Alfred Monash University and Burnet Institute, Australia received the 2012 IAS-ANRS Young Investigator Award for HIV Cure for her research on myeloid dendritic cells and HIV latency in resting T cells in Sharon Lewin's laboratory.

The Symposium Programme Committee

Symposium material

  • Related documents
  • Day 1
  • Day 2
  • Poster Exhib.
  • Rapporteurs Sum.
  • Multimedia

Opening Session: Lessons learned from Cancer cure research

Welcoming Remarks
Anthony S. Fauci, M.D., Director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, NIH

Video

Keynote Presentation – HIV Eradication: Understanding the magnitude of the problem
Presenter: Robert Siliciano, John Hopkins University School of Medicine

PowerPoint Presentation | Video

Session 1: Determine cellular and viral mechanisms that maintain HIV persistence

Overview Presentation
Presenter: Warner Greene, Gladstone Instititute, UCSF, United States

Video

S1.1 – Unique regulatory mechanisms of CNS-derived HIV-1 LTRs associated with latency
Presenter: Lachlan Gray, Burnet Institute, Australia

PowerPoint Presentation | Abstract on AIDS 2012 website | Video

S1.2 – The SIN3/HDAC epigenetic regulator mediates repression of the viral LTR and facilitates HIV-1 post-integration latency
Presenter: Virginie Gautier, University College Dublin, Centre for Research in Infectious Diseases, Ireland

PowerPoint Presentation | Abstract on AIDS 2012 website | Video

S1.3 – Mechanisms involved in persistent HIV infection of astrocytes
Presenter: Guanhan Li, NIH/NINDS, United States

PowerPoint Presentation | Video

S1.4 – CBF-1 induces both establishment and maintenance of HIV latency via recruiting PcG corepressor complex at LTR
Presenter: Mudit Tyagi, George Mason University, United States

PowerPoint Presentation | Abstract on AIDS 2012 website | Video

Session 2: Determine the tissue and cellular sources of persistent HIV in long-term ART-treated individuals

Overview Presentation
Presenter: Janice Clements, John Hopkins University School of Medicine, United States

Presentation | Video

S2.1 – Viral tissue reservoirs are determined early and little viral RNA is detected during suppression by three or four drug regimens in the macaque model
Presenter: Zandrea Ambrose, University of Pittsburgh, School of Medicine, United States

PowerPoint Presentation |Abstract on AIDS 2012 website | Video

S2.2 – Myeloid dendritic cells and HIV latency in resting T cells
Presenter: Nitasha Kumar, Monash University, Australia

PowerPoint Presentation | Abstract on AIDS 2012 website | Video

S2.3 – Characterization of persistent HIV-1 in a broad spectrum of CD4+ T cells isolated from peripheral blood and gut associated lymphoid tissue from patients on long-term suppressive therapy
Presenter: Lina Josefsson, Karolinska Institutet, Sweden

PowerPoint Presentation | Abstract on AIDS 2012 website | Video

Session 3: Determine the origins of immune activation and inflammation in the presence of ART and their consequences for HIV persistence

Overview Presentation
Presenter: Daniel Douek, Vaccine Research Center NIAID, United States

Video

S3.1 – Glut1: establishing a new paradigm for HIV-1 infection by regulating glucose metabolism and activation in CD4+ T cells in HIV-1 infected subjects
Presenter: Clovis Steve Palmer, Burnet Institute, Virology, Australia

PowerPoint Presentation |Abstract on AIDS 2012 website | Video

S3.2 – Immunologic nonresponders to HAART have elevated mucosal inflammation
Presenter: Richard M. Dunham, University of California, San Francisco, United States

PowerPoint Presentation | Abstract on AIDS 2012 website | Video

S3.3 – Comprehensive analysis of viral persistence and immune activation in lymphnodes of HIV-1 infected individuals during HAART
Presenter: Jan van Lunzen, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Germany

PowerPoint Presentation | Abstract on AIDS 2012 website | Video

S3.4 – Very early initiation of combination antiviral therapy results in normal levels of markers of immune activation
Presenter: Martin Markowitz, Aaron Diamond AIDS Research Center, United States

PowerPoint Presentation | Abstract on AIDS 2012 website | Video

Session 4: Determine host and immune mechanisms that control infection but allow viral persistence

Overview Presentation
Presenter: Asier Sáez-Cirión, Pasteur Institute, France

S4.1 – HIV controllers maintain a population of highly efficient Th1 effector cells in spite of persistently low viral anitgenemia
Presenter: Lisa A. Chakrabarti, Pasteur Institute, France

PowerPoint Presentation | Abstract on AIDS 2012 website | Video

S4.2 – Natural control of HIV infection is associated with an isotype switched IgG antibody to HIV core antigens in patients with ‘non-protective’ HLA-B alleles
Presenter: Martyn French, University of Western Australia, Australia

PowerPoint Presentation | Abstract on AIDS 2012 website | Video

S4.3 – Anti-APOBEC3G activity of HIV-1 Vif protein from elite controllers is attenuated compared to those from untreated chronic progressors or those from individuals with acute infection
Presenter: Tadashi Kikuchi, The Institute of Medical Science, University of Tokyo, Japan

Abstract on AIDS 2012 website | Video

S4.4 – APOBEC3G levels are inversely associated with resting CD4+ T memory cell integrated provirus in vivo and infectivity of reactivated HIV-1 ex vivo
Presenter: Maria-Pia de Pasquale, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, United States

PowerPoint Presentation | Abstract on AIDS 2012 website | Video

Session 5: Study, compare and validate assays to measure persistent infection

Overview Presentation
Presenter: Sarah Palmer, Karolinska Instituet, Sweden

PowerPoint Presentation | Video

S5.1 – Distribution of the HIV reservoir in patients spontaneously controlling HIV infection after treatment interruption
Presenter: Charline Bacchus, Cellular and Tissular Immunology Laboratory, Pierre and Marie Curie University, France

Abstract on AIDS 2012 website

S5.2 – High levels of HIV DNA in CCR7+ memory CD4 T-cells in GALT of HIV+ patients on ART with undetectable plasma VL
Presenter: Joseph Wong, University of California, San Francisco, United States

PowerPoint Presentation | Abstract on AIDS 2012 website | Video

S5.3 – Ex vivo modeling of HIV persistence in successfully treated subjects: A powerful tool to evaluate novel therapeutic eradication strategies
Presenter: Remi Fromentin, VGTI Florida, United States

PowerPoint Presentation | Abstract on AIDS 2012 website | Video

S5.4 – Novel approaches for the assessment of the in vivo residual virus pool and viral eradication strategies in SIV-infected rhesus macaques
Presenter: Gregory del Prete, SAIC-Frederick, Inc., Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research, United States

PowerPoint Presentation | Video

Session 6: Develop and test therapeutic agents or immunological strategies to safely eliminate latent infection in individuals on ART

Overview Presentation
Presenter: David Margolis, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, United States

PowerPoint Presentation | Video

S6.1 – Glucocorticoid treatment as a means to decrease the CD16+ monocyte virus reservoir in SIV/HIV infection
Presenter: Marcin Moniuszko, Medical University of Bialystok, Poland

PowerPoint Presentation | Abstract on AIDS 2012 website | Video

S6.2 – High throughput screening for latent HIV reactivating compounds
Presenter: Roger Sutmuller, Janssen Infectious Diseases – Diagnostics BVBA, Belgium

PowerPoint Presentation | Abstract on AIDS 2012 website | Video

S6.3 – Long-term reduction in peripheral blood HIV-1 reservoirs following reduced intensity conditioning allogenic stem cell transplantation in two HIV-infected individuals
Presenter: Timothy J Henrich, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, United States

PowerPoint Presentation | Abstract on AIDS 2012 website | Video

S6.4 – Evaluation of treatment with the Histone Deacetylase Inhibitor Vorinostat (suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid; SAHA) in Antiretroviral Drug Treated, SIVmac239-Infected Rhesus Macaques
Presenter: Jeff Lifson, SAIC Frederick, Inc., Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research, United States

PowerPoint Presentation | Abstract on AIDS 2012 website | Video

S6.5 – Complete transcriptome analysis of latently infected CD4+ T cells
Presenter: Fabio Romerio, University of Maryland School of Medicine, United States

PowerPoint Presentation | Abstract on AIDS 2012 website | Video

Session 7: Develop and test strategies to enhance the capacity of the host response to control active viral replication

Overview Presentation
Presenter: Giuseppe Pantaleo, University of Lausanne, Switzerland

Presentation | Video

S7.1 – SIVagm infection of rhesus macaques: a model of functional cure with persistent reservoirs of replication-competent virus
Presenter: Cristian Apetrei, University of Pittsburgh, United States

Presentation | Abstract on AIDS 2012 website | Video

S7.2 – Towards a therapeutic vaccine to reduce HIV reservoir, both neutralizing HIV and inhibiting effector T cell depletion
Presenter: Patrice Debré, INSERM UMR945, France

Presentation | Abstract on AIDS 2012 website | Video

S7.3 – Impact of therapeutic vaccination on CTL immunodominance and viral suppression in SIV-infected rhesus macaques under HAART
Presenter: Yusuke Takahara, National Institute of Infectious Diseases, Japan

Presentation | Abstract on AIDS 2012 website | Video

S7.4 – The majority of freshly sorted SIV-specific CD8+ T cells cannot suppress viral replication in SIV-infected macrophages
Presenter: Lara Vojnov, University of Wisonsin-Madison, United Statesn

Presentation | Abstract on AIDS 2012 website | Video

Closing Session


IAS-ANRS Young Investigator Award on HIV Cure Research, presented by Françoise Barré-Sinoussi and Jean-François Delfraissy Awarded to Nitasha Kumar

Video

Study: Psychosocial benefits of an HIV Cure
Presenter: Fred Verdult, Volle-Maan, The Netherlands

PowerPoint Presentation | Video

Theme 1: Cellular and viral mechanisms that maintain HIV persistence


1. Amino Acid starvation induces reactivation of integrated transgenes and HIV-1 provirus via downregulation of HDAC4
I. Palmisano1, G. Della Chiara2, A. Mai3, F. Martinelli-Boneschi4, D. Gabellini5, M.V. Schiaffino1, G. Poli2,6
1San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Center for Translational Genomics and BioInformatics, Milano, Italy, 2San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Immunology and Infectious Diseases, Milano, Italy, 3Istituto Pasteur-Fondazione Cenci Bolognetti, Sapienza University of Roma, Dipartimento di Chimica e Tecnologie del Farmaco, Roma, Italy, 4San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Neuroscience, Milano, Italy, 5San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Dulbecco Telethon Institute and Division of Regenerative Medicine, Milano, Italy, 6Vita-Salute San Raffele University, Immunology and Infectious Diseases, Milano, Italy.

Abstract

2. Modeling HIV latency using the humanized BLT mouse
M. Marsden, M. Kovochich, N. Suree, S. Shimizu, R. Mehta, R. Cortado, G. Bristol, D.S. An, J. Zack
UCLA, Los Angeles, United States.

Abstract

3. Dissecting HIV-1 integration site selection using a human LEDGF/p75 knockout cell line
R. Schrijvers1, S. Vets1, J. De Rijck1, F.D. Bushman2, R. Gijsbers1, Z. Debyser1, 1KULeuven
Center for Molecular medicine, Leuven, Belgium, 2University of Pennsylvania, School of medicine, Philadelphia, United States.

Abstract

4. HIC1-mediated HIV-1 latency establishment and persistence in microglial cells
V. Le Douce, C. Schwartz, O. Rohr,
Université de Strasbourg, IPPTS - DHPI, Strasbourg, France.

Abstract

5. An integral ribosome entry site provides a novel pathway for Tat expression from chimeric cellular-HIV Tat mRNAs produced by alternative splicing during proviral post-integration latency
J.Jacobesen1, T.Mota1, J. Howard1, V.Evans2, S. Saleh2, M. Alexander1, R. Center1, S. Lewin2,3,4, D. Purcell1
1University of Melbourne, Microbiology and Immunology, Parkville, Australia, 2Monash University, Department of Medicine, Melbourne, Australia, 3Alfred Hospital, Infectious Diseases Unit, Prahran, Australia, 4Burnet Institute, Center for Virology, Prahran, Australia


Theme 2: Tissue and cellular sources of persistent HIV in long-term ART-treated individuals


6. Role of macrophages as reservoirs in CNS and Spleen: SIV model of HAART
J. Clements, J. Russell, L. Gama, J. Mankowski, C. Zink
John Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, United States


7. CXCR4-tropism is associated with the preferential establishment of an HIV-reservoir in naïve CD4+ T-cells among HIV-infected Ugandan children receiving antiretroviral therapy
T. Ruel1, J. Achan2, W. Huang3, H. Cao4, P. Li4, L.A. Eller5, M. Killian4, E. Sinclair4, E. Charlebois4, D. Havlir4, J. Wong4
1University of Calfornia, San Francisco, Department of Pediatrics, San Francisco, United States, 2Makerere University College of Health Sciences, Department of Paediatrics, Kampala, Uganda, 3Monogram Biosciences, South San Francisco, United States, 4University of Calfornia, San Francisco, Department of Medicine, San Francisco, United States, 5US Military HIV Research Program, Bethesda, United States

Abstract

7. Superinfection of latently infected cells by drug resistant viruses can lead to recombination with latent viruses, contributing to the development of multi-drug resistance
D.A. Donahue, R.D. Sloan, M.A. Wainberg
McGill University AIDS Centre, Montreal, Canada

Abstract

Theme 3: The origins of immune activation and inflammation in the presence of ART and their consequences for HIV persistence


8. Differential SIV infection patterns of lymph node-resident CD4 T cells distinguishes progressive from nonprogressive SIV infection
C. Vinton1,2, J. Brenchley1,2, B. Tabb3, X.P Hao4, V.M Hirsch2, M. Paiardini5, J. Lifson3, G. Silvestri5, J.D. Estes3
1National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Program in Barrier Immunity and Repair and Immunopathogenesis Unit, Bethesda, United States, 2National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Laboratory of Molecular Microbiology, Bethesda, United States, 3National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, AIDS and Cancer Virus Program, Frederick, United States, 4National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Pathology and Histotechnology Laboratory, Frederick, United States, 5Emory University, Atlanta, United States

Abstract

9. Association of interleukin-10 promoter genetic variants with T-cell and B-cell activation in HIV-1 infection
D.D Naicker1, B.D Julg2, C. McClurg2, M.S. Ghebremichael2, F. Porichis2, J. Zupkosky2, M. Jaggernath1, M. Mokgoro1, P.J.R. Goulder3, B.D. Walker2, D.E. Kaufmann2,4, T. Ndung'u1
1Nelson R. Mandela School of Medicine, University of KwaZulu-Natal, HIV Pathogenesis Programme (HPP), Duban, South Africa, 2Ragon Institute of MGH, MIT and Harvard, Boston, United States, 3University of Oxford, Department of Paediatrics, Nuffield Department of Medicine, United Kingdom, 4Massachusetts General Hospital, Division of Infectious Diseases, Boston, United States

10. Estimating the turnover of SIV DNA in resting CD4+ T Cells: implications for attempts to purge the reservoir
J.Reece1, J. Petravic2, R. De Rose1, L.Loh1, S. Gooneratne1, T. Amarasena1, M. Balamurali2, M.Davenport2, S. Kent1
1University of Melbourne, Microbiology and Immunology, Melbourne, Australia, 2University of South Wales, Centre for Vascular Research, Sydney, Australia

Abstract

11. Discordance between peripheral blood and tissue CD4 T-cell reconstitution in SIV-infected Rhesus Monkeys during combination antiretroviral therapy (cART)
M. Di Mascio1, C. Paik2, I. Kim3, S. Srinivasula4, G. Duralde1, P. DeGrange5, A.A. Price6, K.A. Reimann6, M. St Claire7, R.C. Reba7,8, H.C. Lane1
1Division of Clinical Research, NIAID, NIH, Bethesda, United States, 2Radiopharmaceutical Laboratory, Nuclear Medicine, Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Clinical Center, NIH, Bethesda, United States, 3Applied/Developmental Research Directorate, SAIC-Frederick Inc, Frederick, United States, 4Biostatistics Research Branch, SAIC-Frederick Inc, NCI-Frederick, Frederick, United States, 5Battelle/Charles River-Integrated Research Facility, NIAID Frederick, Frederick, United States, 6Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, United States, 7Integrated Research Facility, NIAID, NIH, Frederick, United States, 8Center for Infectious Disease Imaging, Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Clinical Center, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, United States

Abstract

Theme 4: Host and immune mechanisms that control infection but allow viral persistence


12. The colocalization potential of HIV-specific CD8+ and CD4+ T-cells is mediated by integrin 7 but not CCR6 and regulated by retinoic acid
V.S. Wacleche1,2, N.Chomont3, A. Gosselin2, P. Monteiro1,2,4, M. Goupil1, H. Kared1,2, C. Tremblay1,2, N. Bernard5, M.-R. Boulassel6, J.-P. Routy4,6,7, P. Ancuta1,2,4
1Université de Montréal, Microbiology and Immunology, Montreal, Canada, 2Centre Hospitalier de l’ Université de Montréal – Research Centre, Montreal, Canada, 3VGTI-Florida, Port St Lucie, United States, 4INSERM Unit 743, Montreal, Canada, 5Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Canada, 6Division of Hematology, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Canada, 7Immunodeficiency Service, Montreal Chest Institute, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Canada

Abstract

13. Genomic basis of drug-mediated and natural control of plasma viremia in HIV patients
V. Conceicao1, W. Dyer2, K. Gandhi1, P. Gupta1, B. Wang1, N. Saksena1
1Westmead Millennium Institute, Center for Virus Research, Sydney, Australia, 1Australian RedCross, Tissue typing virology, Sydney, Australia

Abstract

Theme 5: Study, compare, and validate assays to measure persistent infection


14. M1 polarization of human monocyte-derived macrophages restricts pre= and post-integration steps of HIV-1 replication
L. Cassetta1, A. Kajaste-Rudnitski1, E. Saba1, E. Vicenzi1, G.Poli1,2
1San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Immunology and Infectious Diseases, Milano, Italy, 2Vita-Salute San Raffaele University, Immunology and Infectious Diseases, Milano, Italy

Abstract

15. A Phase II, randomized, double-blind, multicenter, immunogenecity study of Vacc-4x versus placebo in patients infected with HIV-1 who have maintained an adequate response to ART
J. Rockstroh1, R. Pollard2, G. Pantaleo3, D. Podzamczer4, D. Asmuth2, J. van Lunzen5, K. Arastéh6, D. Schürmann7, B. Peters8, B. Clotet9, D. Hardy10, A. Lazzarin11, J. Gatell12, K. Ellefsen-Lavoie3, M. Sommerfelt13, I. Baksaas14, V. Wendel- Hansen13, B. Sørensen13, The Vacc-4x Study Group
1University of Bonn, Bonn, Germany, 2University of California at Davis, Davis, United States, 3University of Lausanne, Lausanne, Switzerland, 4Universitari de Bellvitge, Barcelona, Spain, 5Universitatsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany, 6EPIMED Gesellschaft fur Epidemiologischen und Klinische Forschung in der Medizin mbh, Berlin, Germany, 7Charité Campus Virchow-Klinikum Medizinsche Klinik mit Schwerpunkt Infektiologi, Berlin, Germany, 8Guy’s and St. Thomas’ Hospital, London, United Kingdom, 9Hospital Germans Trias i Pujol, Badalona, Spain, 10Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, United States, 11San Raffaele Vita-Salute University, Milan, Italy, 12Hospital Clinic i Provincial, Barcelona, Spain, 13Bionor Pharma ASA, Oslo, Norway, 14Mericon AS, Skien, Norway


16. Size and decay of the resting CD4+ T cell latent HIV reservoir during HAART in HIV-infected infants
D. Persaud1, P. Palumbo2, C.Ziemniak1, M.D. Hughes3, C.G. Alvero3, K. Luzuriaga4, R. Yogev5, E.V. Capparelli6, E.G. Chadwick5, IMPAACT-P1030
1Johns Hopkins University, Pediatric Infectious Diseases, Baltimore, United States, 2Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Pediatrics, Lebanon, United States, 3Harvard School of Public Health, Center for Biostatistics in AIDS Research, Boston, United States, 4University of MA Medical School, Pediatrics and Molecular Medicine, Worcester, United States, 5Children’s Memorial Hospital, Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine, Pediatrics/Division of Infectious Diseases, Chicago, United States, 6University of California San Diego, 6Department of Clinical Pharmacy, San Diego, United States

Abstract

Theme 6: Therapeutic agents or immunological strategies to safely eliminate latent infection in individuals on ART


17. Towards HIV eradication: excision of HIV-1 proviral DNA by Tre-recombinase in HIV-infected humanized mice
H. Hofmann-Sieber1, I. Hauber1, J. Chemnitz1, A. Grundhoff1, J. Chusainow2, A. Schambach3, C. Baum3, P. Ziegler4, M. Manz5, F. Buchholz2, J. Hauber1
1Heinrich Pette Institute - Leibniz Institute for Experimental Virology, Hamburg, Germany, 2University of Technology Dresden, University Hospital and Medical Faculty Carl Gustav Carus, Department of Medical Systems Biology, Dresden, Germany, 3Hannover Medical School, Institute of Experimental Hematology, Hannover, Germany, 4Institute for Research in Biomedicine, Bellinzona, Switzerland, 5University Hospital Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland

Abstract

18. Improving means to activate/eliminate latent HIV reservoirs
M. Marsden1, M. Kovochich1, B. DeChristopher2, B. Loy2, A. Schrier2, D. Buehler1, L. Rome1, P. Wender2, J. Zack1
1David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, United States, 2Stanford University, Stanford, United States

Abstract

19. The cure of the "Berlin patient": why did pre-existing X4-variants not emergence after allogeneic CCR5-32 SCT?
J. Symons1, S. Deeks2, G. Hutter3, A. Wensing1, J. Martin2, P. van Ham1, L. Vandekerckhove4, M. Nijhuis1
1University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Virology, Utrecht, Netherlands, 2University of California, Department of Medicine, San Francisco, United States, 3Heidelberg University, Institute of Transfusion Medicine and Immunology, Mannheim, Germany, 4Ghent University Hospital, Department of Internal Medicine, Infectious Diseases and Phychosomatic Medicine, Ghent, Belgium

Abstract

20. Maraviroc (MVC) can activate NFkB in resting CD4 T cells of patients infected with R5 or D/M HIV-1
N. Madrid-Elena, B. Hernandez-Novoa, M. Lamas, L. Garcia-Bermejo, S. Moreno
Hospital Ramon y Cajal, Madrid, Spain

Abstract

21. Impact of immunosuppressive therapies on HIV persistence during kidney transplantation
P. Stock1, B. Barin2, H. Hatano1, R. Rogers1, M. Roland1, T.-H. Lee3, M. Busch3, S.Deeks1, for Solid Organ Transplantation in HIV Study Investigators
1University of California at San Francisco, San Francisco, United States, 2The EMMES Corporation, Rockville, United States, 3Blood Systems Research Institute, San Francisco, United States

Abstract

22. Full suppression of viremia and restriction of the viral reservoir in SIVmac251 infected rhesus macaques treated with mega-ART
I.L Shytaj1, S. Norelli1, A. Della Corte1, B. Chirullo1, M. Collins2, J. Yalley-Ogunro2, J. Greenhouse2, E. Garaci3, M.G. Lewis2, A. Savarino1
1Istituto Superiore di Sanità, Dept. of Infectious, Parasitic and Immune-mediated Diseases, Rome, Italy, 2Bioqual Inc., Rockville, United States, 3Tor Vergata University, Rome, Italy


Theme 7: Strategies to enhance the capacity of the host response to control active viral replication


23. mRNA-based dendritic cell vaccination induces potent antiviral T-cell responses in HIV-1 infected patients
G. Vanham1, Z.N. Berneman2, Interuniversity Attraction Pole 'Inhibition of HIV Replication HIV-STOP' (Belgian Science Policy Office, P6/41)
1Institute of Tropical Medicine, Antwerp, Belgium, 2Antwerp University Hospital, University of Antwerp, Antwerp, Belgium


24. Altering immunodominance hierarchy of p55gag by DNA vaccine expressing conserved regions
G. Pavlakis1, V. Kulkarni1, A. Valentin1, M. Rosati1, N. Sardesai2, B. Mothe3, C. Brander3, S. Legall4, D. Weiner5, M. Rolland6, J. Mullins6, B. Felber1
1National Cancer Institute at Frederick, Center for Cancer Research, Frederick, United States, 2Inovio Pharmaceuticals, Inc., Blue Bell, United States, 3IrsiCaixa-HIVACAT, Barcelona, Spain, 4Ragon Institute, Boston, United States, 5University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, United States, 6University of Washington, Seattle, United States


25. Chimeric rhinoviruses displaying the 4E10 epitope elicit broad neutralizing responses in guinea pigs
G. Yi1,2, R. Bradley1, T. Mariano1, D. Elsasser1, S. Hughes1, T. Wrin3, C. Petropoulos3, E. Arnold1, G. Arnold1
1Rutgers University, Center for Advanced Biotechnology and Medicine/Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Piscataway, United States, 2Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, Dept of Biomedical Sciences, Paul L Foster School of Medicine, El Paso, United States, 3Monogram Biosciences, South San Francisco, United States


26. Therapeutic immunization of SIV-infected rhesus macaques with a cytokine-enhanced pDNA prime, rVSV boost vaccination regimen augments virus-specific immunity and elicits de novo immune
M.A. Egan, R. Xu, A. Ota-Setlik, B. Nowak, T. Latham, S. Hamm, D. Matassov, D.K. Clarke, J.H. Eldridge
Profectus Biosciences, Tarrytown, United States

Abstract

27. A score for data integration of immunological data: application to HIV therapeutic vaccine development
L. Richert1, M. Montes2, M. Surenaud3, C. Boucherie1, G. Zurawski2, S. Zurawski2, A.K. Palucka2, J. Banchereau2, Y. Levy3, G. Chêne1, R. Thiebaut1
1Inserm U897, Bordeaux Segalen University, Bordeaux, France, 2Baylor Institute for Immunology Research, Dallas, United States, 3INSERM, UPEC, Creteil, France

Abstract

28. Evidence of post-transplant resistance in PBMC's tp HIV1 in vitro from a CCR5-delta32 cord blood transplant recipient
Y. Bryson1, L. Petz2, B. Ank1, I. Redei3, R. Tonai2, D. Senitzer4, J. Rossi4, J. Zaia4, S. Forman4
1David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Pediatric Infectious Diseases, Los Angeles, United States, 2StemCyte International Cord Blood Center, Covina, United States, 3The Midwestern Regional Medical Center, Zion, United States, 4City of Hope, Duarte, United States

Community Scientific Literacy Workshop

Opening Session
Rapporteur: Marta Massanella, AIDS Research Institute IrsiCaixa

Summary

Session 1
Determine cellular and viral mechanisms that maintain HIV persistence
Co-Chair & Rapporteur: Damian Purcell, University of Melbourne

Summary

Session 2
Determine the tissue and cellular sources of persistent HIV in long- term ART-treated individuals
Co-Chair & Rapporteur: Adam Spivak, University of Utah, School of Medicine

Summary

Session 3
Determine the origins of immune activation and inflammation in the presence of ART and their consequences for HIV persistence
Rapporteur: Netanya Sandler, National Institutes of Health, USA

Summary

Session 4
Determine host and immune mechanisms that control infection but allow viral persistence
Rapporteur: Mirko Paiardini, Emory University School of Medicine, Yerkes National Primate Research Center, Atlanta

Summary

Session 5
Study, compare and validate assays to measure persistent infection
Rapporteur: Nancie M. Archin, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

Summary

Session 6
Develop and test therapeutic agents or immunological strategies to safely eliminate latent infection in individuals on ART
Rapporteur: Hiroyu Hatano, University of California, San Francisco, USA

Summary

Session 7
Develop and test strategies to enhance the capacity of the host response to control active viral replication
Co-Chair & Rapporteur: Lydie Trautmann, VGTI Florida

Summary

Closing Session
Rapporteur: Marta Massanella, AIDS Research Institute IrsiCaixa

Summary

Poster Exhibition
Rapporteurs: Lachlan Gray, Burnet Institute, Australia and María Buzón, Ragon Institute of MGH, MIT and Harvard, USA

Summary