International AIDS Society


Abstract



Integrated HIV testing, malaria, and diarrhea prevention campaign in Kenya: cost-effectiveness

J.G. Kahn1,2, B. Harris3, E. Lugada4, T. Clasen5, M. Grabowsky6

Background: Efficient community delivery of interventions for HIV, malaria, and diarrhea is essential for scale-up of global health efforts. A 7-day campaign in Western Province, Kenya, provided HIV testing and counseling, water filters, insecticide-treated bed nets, condoms, and for HIV-infected individuals 3 months of cotrimoxazole and referral to care. More than 40,000 (80%) of targeted adults were reached. We assessed campaign cost-effectiveness.
Methods: We calculated cost from project records and program observation, adjusted to scaled-up implementation, and savings due to averted disease from published cost data. We estimated averted disease and disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) based on published estimates of baseline mortality and morbidity and of the protective effect of interventions, and anticipated duration of protection.
Results: Campaign cost was estimated at $32 per participant (including 70% commodities, 18% personnel), by disease $6 for HIV, $16 for diarrhea, and $10 for malaria. Estimated savings due to averted disease were $92 per participant, yielding net savings of $60 per participant. Prevention benefits were estimated at 0.30 DALYs averted per participant. When incorporating the potential impact of early testing and reduced morbidity on the use of anti-retroviral therapy, the campaign had an estimated $4 net savings and 0.40 DALYs averted per participant.
Conclusions: A mass, rapidly implemented campaign for HIV testing, safe water, and malaria control appears economically attractive.





5th IAS Conference on HIV Pathogenesis and Treatment
Abstract no. LBPED06


Suggested Citation
"J.G.Kahn, et al. Integrated HIV testing, malaria, and diarrhea prevention campaign in Kenya: cost-effectiveness . : 5th IAS Conference on HIV Pathogenesis and Treatment: Abstract no. LBPED06 "